PIERCE’S DISEASE CONTROL PROGRAM

State Miscellaneous Ruling

Article 1.  General Provisions.

Section 3650.       Legislative Intent and Authority.

(a)     The Legislature has declared that the plant killing bacterium, Xylella fastidiosa, and the resulting Pierce’s disease, and its vectors present a clear and present danger to California’s grape industry, as well as to many other commodities and plant life.  The Legislature has created the Pierce’s Disease Control Program in the Department of Food and Agriculture.

(b)     The Secretary is authorized to establish, maintain, and enforce regulations consistent with the intent of the Legislature as expressed in Sections 6045-6047, Food and Agricultural Code, as may be necessary to interpret, clarify, or implement Sections 6045-6047.  This authority shall be liberally construed to effectuate the intent of Sections 6045-6047.

(c)     The regulations in this subchapter are of statewide interest and concern and are intended to wholly occupy the field.

Section 3651.      Control Program.

(a)     The Pierce’s Disease Control Program is to be conducted by the local public entity designated by that county’s board of supervisors under a Department approved local Pierce’s disease workplan, including proposed treatment of Pierce’s disease and its vectors.

(b)     The Department shall provide logistical support and assistance when necessary for combating Pierce's disease and its vectors. Logistical support and assistance includes:

(1)     Biological control assistance..

(2)     Provide information on production practices to reduce levels of Pierce's disease and its vectors.

(3)     Conduct workplan activities when necessary.

(4)     Develop pest control alternatives.

(c)     Workplans.

(1)     The Pierce's Disease Control Program workplan elements shall include, but are not limited to, all of following:

(A)     Develop and deliver producer outreach information and training to local communities, groups, and individuals to organize involvement with the workplan and to raise awareness regarding Pierce's disease and its vectors.

(B)     Develop and deliver ongoing training of the designated local public entity's employees in the biology, survey, and treatment of Pierce's disease and its vectors.

(C)     Identify a local Pierce's disease coordinator within the designated local public entity.

(D)     Conduct detection and delimitation surveys for vectors.

(E)     If determined necessary to prevent the establishment and spread of Pierce's disease and its vectors, direct and coordinate treatment programs to control or eliminate Pierce's disease and its vectors. Treatment programs shall comply with all applicable laws and regulations and shall be conducted in an environmentally responsible manner.

(F)     Develop and implement a data collection system to track and report new infestations of Pierce's disease and its vectors in a manner respectful of property and other rights of those affected.

(2)     The Department may permit the local public entity to establish variations from the standards set forth in this subchapter based on the written submission to the Department of clear and convincing evidence of stakes and risks to justify a more or less stringent standard.

(3)     The local public entity shall conduct a hearing if an application of the workplan is appealed in writing to that entity. The results of said hearing shall be transmitted to the Department. The hearing notice procedures shall meet minimum due process standards appropriate for the circumstances. The notice and hearing procedures shall be set out in the workplan of the local public entity.

Section 3652.      Definitions. 

The following definitions apply to this subchapter:

(a)   “Bulk citrus” means any unprocessed citrus fruit which has not been commercially packed.

(b)   "Bulk grapes” means any unprocessed grapes, which have not been commercially packed.

(c)   "Carriers” means any vehicle, container, or other article or means of conveyance that the Department determines presents a possible risk of artificial spread of vectors.

(d)   "Certification" means the issuance of a certificate in written, stamp, or sticker format by an agricultural commissioner or commissioner representative, which affirms that a shipment meets all applicable regulatory requirements.

(e)   "Infestation" shall mean the detection of five (5) or more adult vectors within any five-day period and within a 300-yard radius, or the detection of multiple life stages within any five-day period and within a 300-yard radius .  Vectors detected in direct association with a shipment from an infested area do not, in themselves, constitute an infestation.

(f)   "Infested area" shall mean an area within one (1.0) mile of a vector infestation or an area which has not been surveyed in a manner approved by the Department to detect vectors.

(g)    “Non-infested area” shall mean one in which no infestations have been detected after survey in a manner approved by the Department to detect vectors or where the infestation designation has been removed.

(h)   “Pierce’s disease” means the disease of grapevines caused by Xylella fastidiosa, a bacterium.

(i)   “Plants” means nursery stock and privately owned plants that may host vectors of Pierce’s disease, except when in the form of seeds, bulbs, stolons, corms, pips, buds, cut flowers, cut foliage, tubers, leafless dormant nursery stock, or harvested fruits and vegetables.

(j)    “Processed grapes” means grapes, which have been juiced, canned, crushed or dried.

(k).   “Vectors or Vectors of Pierce’s disease” shall mean Homalodisca vitripennis , glassy-winged sharpshooter.

Section 3653.      Area Designation Procedures.

(a)     An area shall be designated as non-infested based on written affirmation to the Department by the local public entity that the area has been surveyed in a manner approved by the Department to detect vectors with negative results.

(b)     An area shall be designated as infested when the survey results indicate an infestation is present, the Department has defined the infested area, and the local public entity is notified immediately.  The Department will also provide electronic and/or written notification of the area designations to the other local public entities and other interested or affected parties. 

(c)   The local public entity may appeal an area designation by submission to the Department of a written request for review of the designation accompanied by clear and convincing evidence justifying a change in the designation.  The appeal must be filed no later than ten (10) working days following receipt of the notice of designation.  The Department must respond with a written decision no later than ten (10) working days following receipt of the appeal.  During the pending of the appeal, the designation under appeal shall remain in effect.

(d) The infested area designation shall be removed if:

(1) No additional vectors are detected by trapping or visual surveys during the period of January 1 through October 31 of the year following the last vector detection; or,

(2) Only adult vectors were detected and thorough vector survey/detection activities document that a breeding population is not present.

Section 3654. Inspection of Shipments and Disposition of Infested Shipments.

(a)   All shipments of bulk grapes and plants are subject to inspection by the agricultural commissioner upon arrival at destination.

(b)   Any shipment found to be infested with live vectors shall be refused delivery and may be immediately destroyed unless no damage would be caused to agriculture if the shipment is returned to origin or processed or treated in a manner approved by the Department to eliminate the vectors.

Article 2. Standards for Grapes.     The Secretary hereby establishes the following standards for the movement of bulk grapes to prevent the artificial spread of the Pierce’s disease bacterium and its vectors.

Section 3655.      Standards for Movement.

(a) Bulk grapes shall meet the following standards prior to shipment from an infested area to a non-infested area:

(1)    The bulk grapes have originated from a vineyard which has been treated in a manner approved by the Department to eliminate vectors and the grapes are monitored during harvest; or,

(2)     The bulk grapes have originated from a non-infested vineyard as determined by surveys, including trapping and visual, approved by the Department to detect the presence of vectors and the grapes are monitored during harvest; or,

(3)     If the county agricultural commissioner at origin and destination determine that compliance with subparagraph (1) or (2) is not feasible, the bulk grapes and associated plant material may be moved for processing in a manner approved by the Department which eliminates the potential artificial spread of vectors and the grapes are monitored during harvest if feasible, and upon arrival for processing.  The commissioners shall notify the Department of their determination as soon as it is practicable; or,

(4)     The bulk grapes have completed a post-harvest treatment approved by the Department to eliminate all live vectors.

(b) To ensure that the above standards are met, the grower shall do all of the following:

(1) Notify the county agricultural commissioner (of the county in which the vineyard is located) a minimum of 72 hours prior to the initiation of harvest.

(2) Assure that a certificate, as provided in Section 3656, is attached to every shipment and is provided to the receiver.

(3) Maintain harvest and shipment records for two years. These records shall be made available to the county agricultural commissioner during normal business hours.

(c)To ensure that the above standards are met, the receiver shall do all of the following:

(1) Conduct a trapping and detection program as specified by the agricultural commissioner (of the county in which the receiver is located) to determine if the vector is present at receiver's facility.

(2) Collect the certificates, required in Section 3656, for each shipment and maintain them as part of the shipment documentation.

(3) Dispose of all material other than grapes in a manner that eliminates vector survival risk. Disposal methods include, but are not limited to, steam, crush, cold treat, and solarization.

(4) Maintain trapping, vector detection, and shipment records for two years. These records shall be made available to the county agricultural commissioner during normal business hours.

Section 3656.      Certification.

  Shipments of bulk grapes shall be certified as meeting the standards for movement in the following manner:

(a)     Each shipment of bulk grapes shall be accompanied by a certificate issued by the agricultural commissioner at origin affirming that the shipment meets the standards for movement set forth in Section 3655(a).

(b)     Prior to the movement of each shipment of bulk grapes moved under section 3655(a)(3), the origin agricultural commissioner shall notify the destination agricultural commissioner of the quantity of grapes being moved, the specific destination, and identification information.

Section 3657.      Exemptions. 

These standards do not apply to the following shipments:

(a)     Unprocessed, bulk grapes, which are being transported without undue delay or diversion through non-infested areas to an infested destination for processing or treatment, or are being moved to a destination outside the State.

(b)     Processed grapes.

(c)     Shipments originating from non-infested areas.

Article 3.  Standards for Plants.  The Secretary hereby establishes the following standards for the movements of plants to prevent the artificial spread of the Pierce’s disease bacterium and its vectors.

Section 3658.      Plants. 

Shipments of the following live plants shall meet the requirements of Article 3, Standards for Plants:

Additional Hosts for Glassy-winged Sharpshooter are listed in appendix A.

Scientific Name                 Common Name

Abelia spp.

Abelia

Acacia spp.

Acacia

Acer spp.

Japanese Maple

Aeonium spp.

Aeonium

Aeschynanthus spp.

Basket plant

Agapanthus spp.

Agapanthus

Agonis spp.

Willow myrtle

Ajuga spp.

Bugleweed

Albizia spp.

Albizzia

Aleurites spp.

Aleurites

Alnus spp.

Alder

Alstroemeria spp.

Peruvian lily

Althaea spp.

Hollyhock

Amaranthus spp.

Amaranth

Ambrosia spp.

Ragweed

Amelanchier spp.

Serviceberry

Ananas spp.

Ananas

Annona spp.

Annona (cherimoya)

Antirrhinum spp.

Snapdragon

Aptenia spp.

Aptenia

Aralia spp.

Japanese aralia

Arbutus spp.

Strawberry tree

Archontophoenix spp.

Seaforthia

Arctostaphylos spp.

Manzanita

Arecastrum (Syagrus) spp.

Queen Palm

Aronia spp.

Chokecherry

Asclepias spp.

Milkweed

Asparagus spp.

Asparagus

Aspidistra spp.

Aspidistra

Aucuba spp.

Gold dust plant

Baccharis spp.

Baccharis

Bauhinia spp.

Bauhinia

Berberis spp.

Barberry

Betula spp.

Birch

Bignonia spp.

Bignonia

Bougainvillea spp.

Bougainvillea

Brachychiton spp.

Bottle tree

Brugmansia spp.

Angel’s trumpet-tree

Brunfelsia spp.

Brunfelsia

Buddleja spp.

Butterfly bush

Buxus spp.

Boxwood

Calliandra spp.

Powderpuff

Callistemon spp.

Bottlebrush

Calodendrum spp.

Cape chestnut

Camellia spp.

Camellia

Campsis spp.

Trumpet creeper

Canna spp.

Canna

Capsicum spp.

Pepper, chile

Carica spp.

Papaya

Carissa spp.

Natal plum

Caryota spp.

Fishtail

Cassia spp.

Senna

Castanopsis spp.

Chinquapin

Castanospermum spp.

Castanospermum

Catalpa spp.

Catawba

Ceanothus spp.

Redroot

Cedrus spp.

Deodar cedar

Ceratonia spp.

Carob

Ceratostigma spp.

Ceratostigma

Cercidium spp.

Palo verde

Cercis spp.

Redbud

Cercocarpus spp.

Mountain mahogany

Chamaedorea spp.

Palms

Chenopodium spp.

Lambsquarter

Chilopsis spp.

Desert willow

Chionanthus spp.

Fringe tree

Chitalpa spp.

Chitalpa

Chlorophytum spp.

St. Bernard's lily

Chorisia spp.

Floss-silk tree

Chrysanthemum spp.

Chrysanthemum

Cinnamomum spp.

Cinnamomum

Cissus spp.

Grape ivy

Cistus spp.

Rock rose

Citrus spp.

Citrus

Clematis spp.

Evergreen clematis

Clytostoma spp.

Clytostoma

Cocculus spp.

Cocculus

Cocos spp.

Cocos

Coffea spp.

Coffee

Coleus spp.

Coleus

Coprosma spp.

Coprosma

Cordyline spp.

Ti

Coreopsis spp.

Coreopsis

Cornus spp.

Dogwood

Cotoneaster spp.

Cotoneaster

Crassula spp.

Crassula

Crataegus spp.

Thornless hawthorn

Cupaniopsis spp.

Cupaniopsis

Cuphea spp.

Cuphea

Cycas spp.

Cycad

Dalbergia spp.

Indian rosewood

Datura spp.

Jimsonweed

Dianthus spp.

Dianthus

Dietes spp.

Dietes

Diospyros spp.

Persimmon

Distictis spp.

Blood trumpet

Dodonaea spp.

Dodonaea

Dracaena spp.

Dracaena

Duranta spp.

Golden dewdrop

Elaeagnus spp.

Elaeagnus

Elaeocarpus spp.

Elaeocarpus

Ensete spp.

Ensete

Erigeron spp.

Fleabane

Eriobotrya spp.

Eriobotrya

Erythrina spp.

Coral tree

Escallonia spp.

Escallonia

Eucalyptus spp.

Eucalyptus

Eugenia spp.

Eugenia

Euonymus spp.

Euonymus

Eupatorium spp.

Boneset

Euryops spp.

Euryops

Fatshedera spp.

Aralia ivy

Fatsia spp.

Japanese fatsia

Feijoa spp.

Feijoa

Ficus spp.

Fig

Forsythia spp.

Golden-bells

Fortunella spp.

Kumquat

Fraxinus spp.

Ash

Gardenia spp.

Gardenia

Gazania spp.

Gazania

Geijera spp.

Geijera

Gelsemium spp.

Yellow jessamine

Geranium spp.

Cranesbill

Gerbera spp.

Transvaal daisy

Ginkgo spp.

Ginkgo

Gladiolus spp.

Gladiolus

Gleditsia spp.

Honey locust

Gossypium spp.

Cotton

Grevillea spp.

Spider flower

Grewia spp.

Grewia

Hardenbergia spp.

Hardenbergia

Harpephyllum spp.

Kaffir plum

Hedera spp.

Ivy

Helianthus spp.

Sunflower

Hemerocallis spp.

Daylily

Heteromeles spp.

Toyon

Hibiscus spp.

Hibiscus

Howea spp.

Sentry palm

Hydrangea spp.

Hydrangea

Hymenosporum spp.

Hymenosporum

Hypericum spp.

St. John’s-wort

Ilex spp.

Holly

Ipomoea spp.

Morning glory

Itea spp.

Itea

Jacaranda spp.

Green ebony

Jasminum spp.

Jasmine

Juglans spp.

Walnut

Juniperus spp.

Juniper

Koelreuteria spp.

Golden-rain tree

Lactuca spp.

Lettuce

Lagerstroemia spp.

Crape myrtle

Lantana spp.

Shrub verbena

Laurus spp.

Laurel

Lavatera spp.

Mallow

Lepidospartum spp.

Scalebroom

Leptospermum spp.

Leptospermum

Leucodendron spp.

Leucodendron

Leucophyllum spp.

Texas Ranger

Leucospermum spp.

Pincushion

Ligustrum spp.

Privet

Limonium spp.

Statice

Lippia spp.

Lippia

Liquidambar spp.

Sweet gum

Liriodendron spp.

Tulip tree

Liriope spp.

Giant turf lily

Litchi spp.

Lychee

Lonicera spp.

Honeysuckle

Loropetalum spp.

Loropetalum

Luma spp.

Luma

Macadamia spp.

Macadamia

Magnolia spp.

Magnolia

Mahonia spp.

Oregon grape

Malus spp.

Apple

Malva spp.

Mallow

Mandevilla spp.

Mandevilla

Mangifera spp.

Mango

Maytenus spp.

Maytenus

Melaleuca spp.

Honey myrtle

Melia spp.

Chinaberry

Metrosideros spp.

Metrosideros

Michelia spp.

Champak

Mirabilis spp.

Umbrella wort

Monarda spp.

Wild bergamot

Monstera spp.

Monstera

Morus spp.

Mulberry

Murraya spp.

Orange jessamine

Musa spp.

Banana

Myoporum spp.

Myoporum

Myrsine spp.

Myrsine

Myrtus spp.

Myrtle

Nandina spp.

Nandina

Nephrolepis spp.

Sword fern

Nerium spp.

Oleander

Nicotiana spp.

Tree tobacco

Nyssa spp.

Tupelo

Oenothera spp.

Evening primrose

Olea spp.

Olive

Opuntia spp.

Cactus

Osmanthus spp.

Osmanthus

Osteospermum spp.

Osteospermum

Pachysandra spp.

Spurge

Pandorea spp.

Pandorea

Parkinsonia spp.

Mexican Palo Verde

Parthenocissus spp.

Woodbine

Passiflora spp.

Passion fruit

Pelargonium spp.

Pelargonium

Penstemon spp.

Beard-tongue

Pereskia spp.

Barbados Gooseberry

Persea spp.

Avocado

Philadelphus spp.

Mock orange

Philodendron spp.

Philodendron

Phlox spp.

Phlox

Phoenixspp.

Date palm

Phormium spp.

Flax lily

Photinia spp.

Photinia

Phyla spp.

Frogfruit

Phytolacca spp.

Pokeweed

Pinus spp.

Pine

Pistacia spp.

Pistachio

Pittosporum spp.

Pittosporum

Platanus spp.

Sycamore

Platycerium spp.

Staghorn fern

Plectranthus spp.

Plectranthus

Plumbago spp.

Leadwort

Podocarpus spp.

Podocarpus

Polygala spp.

Milkwort

Polygonum spp.

Polygonum

Populus spp.

Cottonwood

Portulacaria spp.

Portulacaria

Prosopis spp.

Mesquite

Protea spp.

Protea

Prunus spp.

Prunus

Psidium spp.

Guava

Punica spp.

Pomegranate

Pyracantha spp.

Pyracantha/Firethorn

Pyrus spp.

Pear

Quercus spp.

Oak

Raphiolepis spp.

Raphiolepis

Rhamnus spp.

Buckthorn

Rhododendron spp.

Azalea

Rhus spp.

Sumac

Robinia spp.

Locust

Rosaspp.

Rose

Rubus spp.

Blackberry

Rudbeckia spp.

Coneflower

Ruellia spp.

Mexican bluebells

Salix spp.

Willow

Salvia spp.

Sage

Sambucus spp.

Elderberry

Sapium spp.

Sapium

Sarcococca spp.

Sweet box

Sassafras spp.

Sassafras

Schefflera spp.

Umbrella tree

Schinus spp.

Schinus

Schlumbergera spp.

Christmas cactus

Sedum spp.

Sedum

Simmondsia spp.

Jojoba

Solanum spp.

Solanum

Solidago spp.

Goldenrod

Sonchus spp.

Sonchus

Sophora spp.

Sun king sophora

Sorbus spp.

Mountain ash

Sorghum spp.

Sorghum

Strelitzia spp.

Bird-of-paradise

Syringa spp.

Lilac

Syzygium spp.

Syzygium

Tabebuia spp.

Trumpet tree

Tecoma spp.

Yellowbells

Tecomaria spp.

Tecomaria

Ternstroemia spp.

Ternstroemia

Thuja spp.

Arborvitae

Tipuana spp.

Tipu Tree

Trachelospermum spp.

Trachelospermum

Tradescantia spp.

Spiderwort

Tristania spp.

Tristania

Tulbaghia spp.

Tulbaghia

Tupidanthus spp.

Tupidanthus

Ulmus spp.

Elm

Vauquelinia spp.

Arizona rosewood

Veronica spp.

Speedwell

Viburnum spp.

Viburnum

Vigna spp.

Vigna

Vinca spp.

Periwinkle

Viola spp.

Violet

Vitex spp.

Chaste tree

Vitis spp.

Grape

Washingtonia spp.

Washington palm

Wisteria spp.

Wisteria

Xanthium spp.

Cocklebur

Xylosma spp.

Xylosma

Yucca spp.

Yucca

Zantedeschia spp.

Calla lily

Zea spp.

Zea

Zelkova spp.

Sawleaf zelkova

Ziziphus spp.

Jujube

 

Additional Hosts for Glassy-winged Sharpshooter are listed in appendix A.


Section 3659.      Standards for Movement. 

(a)    Plants shall meet the following standards prior to shipment from an infested area to a non-infested area:

(1)     The plants have been produced, handled, or treated in a manner approved by the Department to eliminate vectors; or,

(2)     The plants originate from a non-infested premise or a non-infested portion of a premise as determined by surveys, including trapping and visual, approved by the Department to detect the presence of vectors and the plants are monitored during loading for shipment; or,

(3)     The plants have been inspected, found to be free of vectors, and have been safeguarded from vectors until shipped.

(b) To ensure that the above standards are met, the nursery shall do all of the following:

(1) Train employees to inspect for and recognize suspect vectors.

(2) Conduct a trapping and detection program as specified by the agricultural commissioner (of the county in which the nursery is located) to determine if the vector is present at the nursery facility.

(3) If the vector is present, conduct an ongoing monitoring program that includes a vector free shipment staging area and inspection of plants for vectors.

(4) Conduct treatments, as necessary, to ensure that each shipment is free of the vectors.

(5) Maintain treatment, vector trapping, detection, and monitoring records for two years. These records shall be made available to the county agricultural commissioner during normal business hours.

Section 3660.      Certification.

  Shipments of plants shall be certified as meeting the standards for movement in the following manner:

(a)     Each shipment of plants shall be accompanied by a certificate issued by the agricultural commissioner at origin affirming that the shipment meets the standards for movement set forth in Section 3659.

Section 3661.      Exemptions.

  These standards do not apply to the following types of shipments:

(a)     Privately owned plants which have been maintained indoors.

(b)     Plants which have been designated by the Department as not presenting a risk for the artificial spread of vectors.

(c)     Plants which are being transported without undue delay or diversion through non-infested areas.

(d)     Plant shipments originating from non-infested areas.

Article 4.  Standards for Citrus Fruit.  The Secretary hereby establishes the following standards for the movement of bulk citrus to prevent the artificial spread of the vectors of Pierce’s disease.

Section 3662. Standards for Movement.

Bulk citrus from an infested area shall meet the standards in (a) or (b) prior to shipment to a non-infested area or an area in which an active control program is being conducted; or prior to transiting a non-infested area or an area in which an active control program is being conducted; or prior to transiting a non-infested area or an area in which an active control program is being conducted. The owner shall notify the county agricultural commissioner (of the county in which the grove is located) a minimum of 72 hours prior to the initiation of harvest.

(a)     The bulk citrus have been harvested, handled, or treated in a manner approved by the Department to eliminate all live vectors including, but not limited to, the following:

(1) Treat grove(s) when infestation levels of vectors are evidenced by multiple detections(s); or,

(2) Mechanically brush and protect citrus from infestation by vectors; or,

(3) Post-harvest treatment of citrus.

(b)     The bulk citrus have originated from a non-infested grove as determined by surveys, including trapping and visual, approved by the Department to detect the presence of vectors and the citrus fruit are monitored during harvest.

(c) To ensure that the standards in (a) or (b) are met, the receiver shall do all of the following:

(1) Collect the certificates, required in Section 3663, for each shipment and maintain them as part of the shipment documentation.

(2) Notify the agricultural commissioner (of the county in which the receiver is located) when suspect vector are detected.

(3) Safeguard infested shipments until rejection action is specified by the agricultural commissioner.

(4) Maintain shipment records for two years. These records shall be made available to the county agricultural commissioner during normal business hours.

Section 3663.  Certification.

Shipments of bulk citrus shall be certified as meeting the standards for movement in the following manner:       

(a)      Each shipment of bulk citrus shall be accompanied by a certificate or other document issued by the agricultural commissioner at origin affirming that the shipment meets the standards for movement set forth in Section 3662.

Section 3663.5  Exemptions. 

These standards do not apply to the following types of shipments:

(a)     Processed citrus fruit, including citrus fruit which has been washed and waxed and is being moved in bulk quantities.

(b)      Shipments originating from non-infested areas.

(c)    Shipments originating in the infested area that do not enter a non-infested area or an area in which an active control program is being conducted

APPENDIX A                                06-25-14

Additional Hosts for Glassy-winged Sharpshooter.            

Scientific Name Common Name
   
Aesculus spp. Horse chestnut
Aloe spp. Aloe
Anigozanthus spp. Kangaroo paw
Begonia spp. Begonia
Caesalpinia spp. Caesalpinia
Cestrum spp. Cestrum
Dianella spp. Dianella
Digitalis spp. Foxglove
Dicksonia spp. Tree fern
Dizygotheca spp. Threadleaf aralia
Eremophila spp. Red emu bush
Hebe spp. Hebe
Lithocarpus spp. Lithocarpous
Piper spp. Pepper plant
Rhapis spp. Lady palm
Sollya spp. Australian bluebell creeper
Trachycarpus spp. Windmill palm
Zinnia spp. Zinnea

APPENDIX B

GWSS Infested Areas

The GWSS infested areas are the entire counties of Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino, San Diego, Ventura, and portions of Fresno, Imperial, Kern, Santa Barbara, Santa Clara, and Tulare counties (see details below). Intrastate shipments found infested with this pest can be rejected under California Food and Agricultural Code Section 6521.

[Please note: Nursery stock from the infested states of Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Louisiana, Mississippi, Nevada, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Texas already enters California under a Quarantine Warning Hold Notice (008). GWSS is also known to occur in Mexico. Interstate shipments found infested with this pest can be rejected under California Food and Agricultural Code Section 6461.5.]   

 

·          Fresno That portion of Fresno County in the Fresno in the Sunnyside area bounded by a line drawn as follows:  Beginning at the intersection of South Willow Avenue and East Tulare Avenue; then, easterly along East Tulare Avenue to its intersection with North Clovis Avenue; then, northerly along North Clovis Avenue to its intersection with East Belmont Avenue; then, easterly along East Belmont Avenue to its intersection with North Temperance Avenue; then, southerly along North Temperance Avenue to the point it becomes South Temperance Avenue; then continuing southerly along said avenue to its intersection with Southern Pacific Railroad; then due west along said railroad to its intersection with South Fowler Avenue; then, continuing southerly along said avenue to its intersection with East Jensen Avenue; then, westerly along East Jensen Avenue to its intersection with South Willow Avenue; then, northerly along South Willow Avenue to the point of beginning.

That portion of Fresno County in the Fresno/Clovis area bounded by a line drawn as follows:  Beginning at the intersection of Highway 99 and the San Joaquin River; then, northeasterly along said river to the point of intersection with an imaginary line drawn due south to the intersection of East Copper Avenue and North Longfield Lane; then, easterly along East Copper Avenue to its intersection with North Willow Avenue; then, southerly along North Willow Avenue to its intersection with East Shephard Avenue; then, easterly along East Shephard Avenue to its intersection with North Temperance Avenue; then, southerly along North Temperance Avenue to its intersection with East Nees Avenue; then, due east on East Nees Avenue to its intersection with North Locan Avenue; then, southerly along North Locan Avenue to its intersection with East Alluvial Avenue; then, easterly along East Alluvial Avenue to its intersection with North Traverse Avenue; then, southerly along North Traverse Avenue to its end; then, following an imaginary line to the intersection of East Herndon Avenue and North Locan Avenue; then, southerly along North Locan Avenue to its intersection with East Ashlan Avenue; then, westerly along East Ashlan Avenue to its intersection with North Fowler Avenue; then, southerly along North Fowler to its intersection with East Shields Avenue; then, westerly along East Shields Avenue to the point it becomes East Airways Blvd, then continuing on said street to the point it becomes North Peach Avenue, then continuing on North Peach Avenue to  its intersection with East Ashlan Avenue; then, westerly along East Ashlan Avenue to its intersection with North Cedar Avenue; then, southerly along North Cedar Avenue to its intersection with East Clinton Avenue; then, westerly on East Clinton Avenue to its intersection with North Blackstone Boulevard; then, southerly on North Blackstone Boulevard to its intersection with East Olive Avenue; then, westerly on East Olive Avenue to the point it becomes West Olive Avenue; then, continuing on West Olive Avenue to its intersection with North Weber Avenue; then, northerly on North Weber Avenue to its intersection with West Clinton Avenue; then, westerly on West Clinton avenue to its intersection with Highway 99; then, southerly on Highway 99 to its intersection with West Belmont Avenue; then, westerly on West Belmont Avenue to its intersection with North Brawley Avenue; then, northerly on North Brawley to its intersection with West Olive Avenue; then, westerly on West Olive Avenue to its intersection with North Hayes Avenue; then, northerly on North Hayes Avenue to its intersection with West Shaw Avenue; then, easterly on West Shaw to its intersection with Highway 99; then northerly on Highway 99 to the point of beginning.

That portion of Fresno County in the Kingsburg area bounded by a line drawn as follows: Beginning at the intersection of Golden State Boulevard and Stroud Avenue; then, easterly along said avenue to its intersection with Eighteenth Avenue; then, southerly along Eighteenth Avenue to its intersection with the Fresno County Line; then, southwesterly along said line to its intersection with Indianola; then, northerly along Indianola to its intersection with Elkhorn Avenue; then, easterly along Elkhorn Avenue to its intersection with Indianola; then, northerly along Indianola to its intersection with Kamm Avenue; then, easterly along Kamm Avenue to its intersection with Bethel Avenue; then, northeasterly along Bethel Avenue to its intersection with Golden State Boulevard; then southerly along said boulevard to the point of beginning.

·          Imperial That portion of Imperial County in the Desert Shores, Salton Sea Beach, and Salton City area bounded by a line drawn as follows: Beginning at the intersection of State Highway 86 and Coolidge Springs Road; then, due east along an imaginary line to its intersection with the Salton Sea; then, southeasterly along the shore of the said sea to its intersection with Arroyo Salada Stream; then, southwesterly along said stream to its intersection with State Highway 86; then, northerly along State Highway 86 to its intersection with Sea View Drive; then, southwesterly along said Sea View Drive to its end; then, northerly from said end along an imaginary line drawn to the western end of Lakeview Court and the point it intersects with Borrego Salton Seaway; then, northwesterly from said point along an imaginary line drawn to the intersection of Marina Drive and Impala Court; then, northeasterly along Marina Drive to its intersection with State Highway 86; then, northwesterly along said highway to its intersection with Tonalee Ditch; then, southwesterly along said ditch to an imaginary line drawn southward from the end of Coolidge Springs Road; then, northerly along said imaginary line and road to the point of beginning.

 

·          Kern That portion of northern Kern County between Bakersfield and the Kern - Tulare County line which incorporates a section of Highway 65 and is bounded by a line drawn as follows: Beginning at the intersection of Zachary Avenue and the Kern - Tulare County line; then, easterly along the Kern - Tulare County line to its intersection with Old Stockton Los Angeles Stage Road; then, due south along an imaginary line drawn to Highway 155; then, southwesterly along an imaginary line drawn to the intersection of Famoso Woody Road and Sherwood Avenue; then, continuing southwesterly along Famoso Woody Road to its intersection with Highway 65; then, southerly along Highway 65 to its intersection with Merced Avenue; then, eastward along Merced Avenue to its end; then, southerly along an imaginary line drawn to the end of the Lerdo Highway; then, westerly along Lerdo Highway to its intersection with Highway 65; then, southerly along Highway 65 to its intersection with James Road; then, due east along an imaginary line drawn to the county line; then, following said county line to its intersection with an imaginary line drawn due west from the end of the intersection of Bear Mountain Road and Coles Levee Road; then, easterly along said imaginary line to the aforementioned intersection of Bear Mountain Road and Coles Levee Road; then, continuing eastward on Bear Mountain Road to its intersection with Highway 99; then, northerly along said highway to its intersection with Curnow Road; then, westerly along said road to its intersection with Wibble Road; then, northerly along Wibble Road to its intersection with the Taft Highway; then, westerly along said highway to its intersection with Stine Road; then, northerly along said road to its intersection with Mccutchen Road; then, westerly along Mccutchen Road to its intersection with Gosford Road; then, northerly along Gosford Road to its intersection with Panama Lane; then, westerly along said lane to its intersection with Buena Vista Road; then, northerly along said road to its intersection with the Pessinger Road; then, due west along Pessinger Road to its intersection with South Allen Road; then, northwesterly along an imaginary line drawn to the southern end of Locksley Lane; then, northerly along said lane to its intersection with the Stockdale Highway; then, westerly along said highway to its intersection with Nord Avenue; then, northerly along said avenue to its intersection with Palm Avenue; then, westerly along Palm Avenue to its intersection with Greely Road; then, northerly along said road to its northern end; then, continuing northerly along an imaginary line drawn to the intersection of Santa Fe Way and Los Angeles Street; then, northerly along Los Angeles Street to its intersection with Orange Street; then, westerly along Orange Street to its intersection with Magnolia Avenue; then, northerly along said avenue to its intersection with Mccombs Avenue; then, easterly along Mccombs Avenue to its end; then, continuing due east along an imaginary line drawn to the intersection of Famoso-Porterville Highway and Mccombs Avenue; then, continuing easterly on said avenue to its intersection with Driver Road; then, northerly on said road to its intersection with Phillips Road; then, easterly on Phillips Road to its intersection with Zachary Avenue; then, northerly on said avenue to its intersection with Hanawalt Avenue; then, westerly on Hanawalt Avenue to its intersection with the Famoso-Porterville Highway; then, northeasterly along said highway to its intersection with Sherwood Avenue; then, westerly on said avenue to its intersection with Zachary Avenue; then, northerly along said Zachary Avenue to the point of beginning.

 

·          Madera That portion of Madera County in the area bounded by a line drawn as follows:  Beginning at the intersection of Avenue 10 and Road 40 ½ ; then, easterly along Avenue 10 to its intersection with Lanes Bridge Drive; then, due east along an imaginary line drawn to its intersection with the San Joaquin River; then southwesterly along the San Joaquin River to the point it intersects an imaginary line drawn due east from the intersection of Avenue 8 and Road 40 ½; then, due west along said line to its intersection with Avenue 8 and Road 40 ½ ; then, due north along road 40 ½ to point of beginning.

 

·          Santa Barbara That portion of Santa Barbara County lying south of a line drawn as follows: Beginning at the Point Arguello lighthouse; then easterly along an imaginary line to the summit of El Tranquillon Mountain; then southeasterly along an imaginary line to the point of intersection of Jalama Creek and Escondido Creek; then easterly along an imaginary line to the point of intersection of Gaviota Creek and the summit of the Santa Ynez Range; then easterly along the summit of the Santa Ynez Range to the east Santa Barbara County boundary line.

 

·         Santa Clara That area of Santa Clara County in the Captiol area of San Jose beginning at the intersection of Curtner Avenue and Canoas Garden Avenue; then, northeasterly along Curnter Avenue to the point it becomes Tully Road; then, continuing along Tully Road to its intersection with Senter Road; then, southeasterly along Senter Road to San Ramon Dr; then, along an imaginary line from said intersection to the intersection of Skyway Drive and Houndshaven Way; then, southwesterly along Skyway Drive to its intersection with Snell Avenue; then, southerly along Snell to its intersection with Chynoweth Avenue; then, westerly along Chynoweth Avenue to its end; then, due west along an imaginary line drawn to the point where Chynoweth continues; then , westerly along Chynoweth Avenue to its intersection with Fell Avenue; then, northerly along Fell Avenue to the point it becomes Oyster Bay Drive; then, westerly and northerly along Oyster Bay Drive to its intersection with Glenmont Drive; then, northwesterly along Glenmont Drive to its intersection with Normington Way; then, westerly and northerly along Normington Way to its intersection with Edenbury Lane; then, westerly  along Edenbury Lane to its intersection with Thousand Oaks Drive; then, northerly along Thousand Oaks Drive to its intersection with Steval Place; then, northerly along Steval Place to its end; then, northerly from said end along an imaginary line drawn to its intersection with Old Almaden Road and West Capitol Expressway; then, continuing northerly along Old Almaden Road to the point it becomes Almaden Expressway; then, continuing northerly along  Almaden Expressway to its intersection with Curtner Avenue; then, easterly along Curtner Avenue to the point of beginning.

 

·          Tulare Tulare That portion of Tulare County which incorporates a section of Highway 65 and is bounded by a line drawn as follows: Beginning at the intersection of Road 216 and Avenue 180; then, westerly along Avenue 180 to its intersection with Road 208; then, northerly along Road 208 to its intersection with Avenue 184; then, westerly along Avenue 184 to its intersection with Road 196; then, northerly along Road 196 to its intersection with Avenue 206; then, westerly along Avenue 206 to its intersection with Road 188; then, northerly along Road 188 to its intersection with Avenue 224; then, easterly along Avenue 224 to its intersection with Road 200; then, northerly along Road 200 to its intersection with Avenue 228; then, northeasterly from said intersection along an imaginary line drawn to the intersection of Road 224 and Avenue 248; then, due east from said point along an imaginary line drawn to its intersection with Road 244; then, southeasterly from said intersection along an imaginary line drawn to the intersection of Avenue 230 and Holworthy; then, continuing southeasterly along an imaginary line drawn to the point of intersection with an imaginary line drawn due north from the intersection of Frazier Highway and Road 276; then, southerly along Road 276 to its intersection with Avenue 176; then, easterly along Avenue 176 to its intersection with Road 288; then, northerly along Road 288 to its end; then, southeasterly from said end to the point of intersection between Road 320 and Blue Ridge; then, easterly along Blue Ridge to its intersection with State Highway 190; then, southerly along State Highway 190 to its intersection with Globe; then, following Globe southerly to its intersection with Tule Oak; then, southwesterly from said intersection along an imaginary line drawn to the intersection of Success Valley and Dillon Ranch Road; then, continuing southwesterly along an imaginary line drawn to the intersection of Reservation and Road 298; then southerly along Road 298 to its intersection with Mountain Road 118; then, southwesterly along an imaginary line drawn to the intersection of Avenue 120 and Road 288; then, continuing on an imaginary line due south to its intersection with Avenue 56; then continuing southerly along said imaginary line to the end of Road 272; then, continuing southerly along Road 272 to its intersection with Mountain Road 33; then, continuing southeasterly along Mountain Road 33 to its intersection with Old Stockton Los Angeles Stage Road; then, southerly along said road to its intersection with the Tulare-Kern County line; then, due west along said county line to its intersection with Road 192; then, northerly along Road 192 to its intersection with Avenue 96; then, easterly along Avenue 96 to its intersection with Road 208; then, northerly along Road 208 to its intersection with Avenue 136; then, easterly along Avenue 136 to its intersection with an imaginary line heading due north from the end of Road 212; then, northerly along said imaginary line to its intersection with Avenue 144; then easterly along Avenue 144 to its intersection with Road 216; then, northerly along Road 216 to its end; then northerly from said end along an imaginary line drawn to the point of beginning.